Langtang National Park


It was established in 1976 to conserve the unique flora and fauna of the region. It is the nearest national park of the capital Kathmandu in the Central Himalayan Region. The 1710 sq. km. of the park extends over parts of Nuwakot, Rasuwa, and Sindhupalchok districts in the southern mountainous terrain of the Nepal-China (Tibet) border. In 1998 an areas of 420 km2 in and around the park declare as a buffer zone. The park represents a meeting point between indo-Malayan and Palearctic realms, and holds a rich biodiversity.

Buffer zone management is a joint venture between the park office and the local communities. Local communities have a decision-making role in the management of such areas. Additionally, the local communities or the BZ receive 30 to 50 % of the park revenue for the better management of natural resources to ensure a sustainable supply of resources and community development .

On a clear day Langtang Lirung (7245 m (23,769 ft)) is visible from Kathmandu. It dominates the surrounding area of the same name which stretches from the north of the Helambu to the Tibetan border. The one-week walk through the Langtang National Park leads to the glacier at the foot of the mountain, then to near the base camp and back. On the way there are good views of the Ganesh Himal chain. The countryside is quite thinly populated but it is possible to spend the night in village guest houses. From the lowest point in Trisuli Bazar at 541 m (1775 ft) to the Kyanjin gompa at 3800 m (12,467 ft) the walk cuts through various climatic zones.

On a clear day Langtang Lirung (7245 m (23,769 ft)) is visible from Kathmandu. It dominates the surrounding area of the same name which stretches from the north of the Helambu to the Tibetan border. The one-week walk through the Langtang National Park leads to the glacier at the foot of the mountain, then to near the base camp and back. On the way there are good views of the Ganesh Himal chain. The countryside is quite thinly populated but it is possible to spend the night in village guest houses. From the lowest point in Trisuli Bazar at 541 m (1775 ft) to the Kyanjin gompa at 3800 m (12,467 ft) the walk cuts through various climatic zones.

The Langtang National Park begins in Dhunche & stretches to the Tibetan border. It encompasses a region of 171 sq. km (66 sq. mi.) including the catchment areas of the Trisuli and Sun Kosi rivers and some of the 7000 m (23,000 ft) mountains. The diverse topography and geology of the region together with the different climatic conditions have resulted in a wide variety of flora and fauna. Below 1000 metres there are small areas of sub-tropical vegetation. The different zones of the Langtang National Park range from oak and pine woods through sub-Alpine juniper, larches and birch to Alpine bushes, scree slopes and snow. Animals found here include pandas, muntjaks, musk, Himalayan bears, serows and monkeys.

About 45 villages are located inside the park boundary but are not subject to the park administration. The 18,000 inhabitants are dependent upon the resources of the park, particularly wood and pastureland. The majority of the population are Tamang, followers of the Buddhist or Bon religion.

Flora and Fauna:

Sub-tropical vegetation characterized by Sal (Shorea robusta) forest in the southern section of the park is gradually taken over by hill forest (2000-2600m) consisting of Chirpine, Rhododendron, and Nepalese alder. The temperate zone (2600-3000m) is covered mainly by oak forest fading to old growth forest of silver fir, hemlock, and larch in the lower sub-alpine zone (3000-3600m). The Nepalese larch (larixnepalensis), the only deciduous conifer in the region, is found in this park and few places elsewhere. Throughout these zones different species of Rhododendron such as R. arboretum, R. barbatum, R. campanulatum, and R. lepidotum (scrubs) to name a few, form a colorful under story. Tree species such as birch, silver fir, Sorbus microphyla and twisted Rhododendroncampanulatum are found near the tree line. It is here at 4000m Juniper and Rhododendron shrubs (R. anthopogon) slowly dissolve into expansive alpine grassland meadows.

Langtang’s expansive high meadows provide summer habitat for numerous ungulate species such as musk deer and Himalayan tahr. The park is also well known for its populations of red panda, Himalayan black bear, snow leopard, wild dog, ghoral, serow and more than 250 species of birds.

Climate:

From mid-October to mid-December and from mid-February until mid-April the weather is usually clear but cold at higher elevations. From mid-April to mid-June, it is warm but often cloudy with thunder showers, spring flowers are at their best. Summer monsoon lasts until the beginning of October. During the winter months daytime temperatures are low and snow may occur even at low levels.

How to Get there:

Public bus or taxi reach Dhunche (Park H.Q.) via Trisuli Bazaar from Kathmandu (approx. 7-8 hrs. ) A seasonal road reaches Syabrubensi.
Alternative routes from Kathmandu are public bus to Sundarijal or Melamchighat. From either point, trek through Helambu to Gosainkunda via Laurebina pass or cross Ganja La pass (5106m) to reach Langtang Valley.

 

 

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